July 2024

Chiropractor Placerville CA

Placerville chiropractor

Placerville Chiropractor

Finding a chiropractor in Placerville can be overwhelming, but your search doesn’t have to be. If you are looking for a chiropractor in Placerville, you have options.

Check with your insurance povider

If you plan on using your health insurance, first be sure your insurance covers chiropractic care. You should also note the amount of visits they allow per year. Plus, be aware of any other limitations. This includes double checking co-pays and if they allow in or out of network chiropractors. A good chiropractor office will ask for your coverage before you walk into the office. But when it comes to medical costs, you want to ensure you do your homework first.

If you decide on a chiropractor who is out of network, you’ll have to decide whether it’s worth paying more for out of network, self-pay, or choosing another. The chiropractor's office will be able to provide you with the cost.

If you’re paying out of pocket, you should research local rates. Include the surrounding areas within the distance you’re willing to commute. This gives you a rough idea of what you’ll pay, which can be helpful if you’re on a budget.

Decide if you have a preference between a male or female chiropractor

Sometimes people have a presence. You should be 100 percent at ease with the chiropractor's presence.

Using a referral may help

A referral from your primary care doctor or specialist should point you toward a reputable Placerville chiropractor. A doctor should only offer recommendations that they would use for themselves and family members. This can help you narrow down your search. If you have special criteria, such as location or their technique, let your doctor know that too.

Have you done some legwork, but you’re unsure about the names you’ve collected? You can share the information with your doctor. Ask if they would recommend any of the names.

Family and friends can also assist you in finding a chiropractor. Personal experiences make the best referrals. Be sure to ask within your circle too.

Once you’ve finished asking around, compare how many people have recommended the same Placerville chiropractor. Chances are that is a great place to focus.

Ensure a chiropractor can treat you

Your chiropractor can treat mechanical issues musculoskeletal system. However, your Placerville chiropractor can’t treat all associated pain with these areas. Severe arthritis, osteoporosis, broken or fractured bones, infected bones, and bone tumor related pain are a few conditions your chiropractor may not treat.

Other conditions some chiropractors can treat are high blood pressure, asthma and post stroke related pain. While these shouldn’t replace traditional medicine, your chiropractor and doctor could use them as therapeutic remedies with medication and other treatments.

Research chiropractor techniques

According to the American Chiropractic Association, they don’t support or endorse any one of the techniques. Chiropractors tend to have a skillset that covers multiple techniques. You should also ask whether the chiropractor uses hand manipulation, instruments or a combination depending on the patient’s need and preference.

If you favor a special technique, you should choose a chiropractor that has experience with it. You can also consider diversifying from what you’ve used in the past, and try a new technique to treat your condition.

Some common chiropractic techniques are:

  • Gonstead
  • Diversified
  • Applied Kinesiology
  • Logan Basic
  • Activator
  • Thompson
  • Flexion distraction

Keep in mind you might not be aware of what you prefer or dislike until after you’ve had your first few treatments. You should be comfortable expressing yourself. Your Placerville chiropractor should listen to your wishes.

Does the chiropractor office offer additional services?

Some offices might offer additional services, such as massage or injury rehabilitation. View additional services as a bonus if the office offers them.

If your chiropractor suggests these services as part of your treatment plan, you will want to make sure your insurance covers them. Your insurance might place different limitations on those services, such as number of allowable visits.

Did the chiropractor attend an accredited institution?

Each state requires chiropractors to hold a doctorate in chiropractic medicine. If you’re unfamiliar with their college, you can search the school’s name on the Council of Chiropractic Education to ensure it’s an accredited institution.

Research the chiropractor online

Websites exist for patients to review their doctors, which includes chiropractors. Unlike testimonials that focus on the positive only, you can expect to see good, in between, and negative reviews from actual patients.

Take the time to read them, and don’t use star ratings to guide your decision. Some reviewers, for example, might dock stars for issues that don’t matter or relate to you. Be sure to note the date on negative reviews as well as any follow up comments from the practice.

How long has the chiropractor been in practice?

Skill and technique do improve with time, so you might prefer an experienced Placerville chiropractor. A few years or longer, in addition to their education, is a decent amount of time for a chiropractor to hone their skills.

However, one with less hands-on experience might offer you the same results. Unless you have a specific preference, the length a chiropractor has been in practice might not matter to you.

Ask for a consult and meet Your chiropractor

Whether you have one chiropractor or a few in mind, you should meet face-to-face before you agree to services. Consider this first meeting like a job interview, but you’re the boss. Be prepared with a list of questions as well as addressing any concerns that arise during your visit.

Make visible inspections upon your visit. Is the office and waiting room clean? Are the staff pleasant and prompt? How long did you have to wait before the chiropractor saw you? Take your answers to these questions as part of the bigger picture.

What does a sample treatment plan look like?

Before you settle on a chiropractor, you should have a basic idea of what to expect during your course of treatment. This includes talking about your expectations as well as your chiropractor’s opinion on your treatment.

Ask about the length of treatment before you should see results. Time invested does vary and depends on the area you require treatment and the severity of your condition. Also, be sure to inquire about what happens if you don’t see improvements.

Personality

You should get along well with your Placerville chiropractor and feel comfortable around them. This includes speaking to them about your care as well as when they touch you. If you don’t feel at-ease, you should consider finding a new chiropractor.

Concerns you should not ignore

The vast majority of chiropractors will put your health and goals first, but you should be cautious of chiropractors pushing unconventional options. Those may include:

  • Non-specialized care, meaning every patient receives the same treatment regardless of his or her pain or needs.
  • Unnecessary X-rays, which are billed to insurance companies. Deceptive chiropractors may push multiple, unnecessary X-rays to drive up the amount they are able to bill an insurance company.
  • You’re expected to heavily invest in a long-term plan prior to examination.
  • In your care plan, your chiropractor doesn’t address goals; there is no mention of pain plateaus or course of action should one occur.
  • The chiropractor makes dubious claims about curing chronic illnesses.
  • The chiropractor claims to be an expert in a technique that nobody has heard about.

As with any doctor, picking a chiropractor is a personal decision. Take your time to find the right one. If something feels off, you can likely change chiropractors.

Placerville chiropractor

Placerville (, PLASS-ər-vil; formerly Old Dry Diggings, Dry Diggings, and Hangtown) is a city in and the county seat of El Dorado County, California. The population was 10,747 as of the 2020 census, up from 10,389 as of the 2010 census. It is part of the Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville Metropolitan Statistical Area. A former Maidu settlement called Indak was located at the site of the town. After the discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill in nearby Coloma, California, by James W. Marshall in 1848 sparked the California Gold Rush, the small town now known as Placerville was known as Dry Diggin's after the manner in which the miners moved cartloads of dry soil to run water to separate the gold from the soil. Later in 1849, the town earned its most common historical name, "Hangtown", because of the numerous hangings that had occurred there. However, there is debate on exactly how many lynchings occurred in the town. The town had no police force (in 1849) and five immigrants attempted robbery of a Mexican gambler. Of the five immigrants, two Frenchmen and one Chilean were known wanted men, and they were not given any trial, instead they were hanged on an oak tree on Main Street by a mob. The name "Hangtown" stuck after that event. By about 1850, the temperance league and a few local churches had begun to request that a more friendly name be bestowed upon the town. The name was not changed until 1854 when the City of Placerville was incorporated, taking the name from the local placer gold deposits. At its incorporation, Placerville was the third largest town in California. In 1857, the county seat was then moved from Coloma to Placerville, where it remains today. The town's first post office opened in 1850. In 1871, the Placerville Union Cemetery was founded by a group of fraternal organizations, and it holds the graves of many of the city founders. Placerville was a central hub for the Mother Lode region's mining operations. The town had many services, including transportation (of people and goods), lodging, banking, and had a market and general store. The history of hard-rock mining is evidenced by an open and accessible Gold Bug Park & Mine, now a museum with tours and books. The Southern Pacific Railroad once had a branch line that extended from Sacramento to Placerville. The track was abandoned in the 1980s. The Camino, Placerville and Lake Tahoe Railroad (now abandoned) also operated an eight-mile (thirteen-kilometer) shortline that operated between Camino, California, and Placerville until June 17, 1986. The track right-of-way is now a 37-mile hiking and biking path that connects the city of Folsom, California to the town of Camino with plans to extend the trail across the entire El Dorado county and eventually to Lake Tahoe. Placerville is now registered as California Historical Landmark #701. Placerville's logo featured a hangman's noose, in reference to the town's history as "Hangtown", until 2021, when the town council voted to remove it. An earlier proposal to redesign the logo had been rejected in 2020. Placerville has several buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places; several are noted below. Placerville is located in the Sierra Nevada foothills where U.S. Route 50 crosses State Route 49. It is the location of three traffic signals along U.S. Route 50, which is otherwise a freeway. Downtown Placerville is about 1,867 feet (569 m) above sea level, while unincorporated areas of the city range from 1,800 feet (550 m) to nearly 4,000 feet (1,200 m). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.8 square miles (15 km2), over 99% of it land. Placerville has cool, frequently wet winters and hot, dry summers, creating a typically Californian Mediterranean climate (Köppen Csa). Average January temperatures are a maximum of 53.4 °F (11.9 °C) and a minimum of 32.5 °F (0.3 °C). Average July temperatures are a maximum of 92.7 °F (33.7 °C) and a minimum of 57.2 °F (14.0 °C). Annually, there are an average of 65.7 days with highs of 90 °F (32 °C) or higher and 61.3 mornings with lows of 32 °F (0 °C) or lower. The record high temperature was 114 °F (46 °C) on July 4, 1911. The record low temperature was 8 °F (−13.3 °C) on December 9, 1972. Average annual rainfall in Placerville is 38.11 inches (968.0 mm). There are an average of 66 days with measurable rain. The wettest calendar year was 1983 with 74.55 inches (1,893.6 mm) and the driest 1976 with 11.85 inches (301 mm). The most rainfall in one month was 23.29 inches (591.6 mm) in December 1955. The most rainfall in 24 hours was 6.22 inches (158 mm) on February 14, 2000. Although snowfall is rare in Placerville, heavy amounts often fall in the mountains east of the city. The 2010 United States Census reported that Placerville had a population of 10,389. The population density was 1,787.3 inhabitants per square mile (690.1/km2). The racial makeup of Placerville was 8,716 (83.9%) White, 80 (0.8%) African American, 162 (1.6%) Native American, 98 (0.9%) Asian, 13 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 867 (8.3%) from other races, and 453 (4.4%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1,863 persons (17.9%). The Census reported that 9,788 people (94.2% of the population) lived in households, 131 (1.3%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 470 (4.5%) were institutionalized. There were 4,129 households, out of which 1,254 (30.4%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 1,607 (38.9%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 604 (14.6%) had a female householder with no husband present, 250 (6.1%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 327 (7.9%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 31 (0.8%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 1,306 households (31.6%) were made up of individuals, and 599 (14.5%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37. There were 2,461 families (59.6% of all households); the average family size was 2.97. The population was spread out, with 2,277 people (21.9%) under the age of 18, 972 people (9.4%) aged 18 to 24, 2,468 people (23.8%) aged 25 to 44, 2,831 people (27.2%) aged 45 to 64, and 1,841 people (17.7%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.4 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.9 males. There were 4,541 housing units at an average density of 781.2 per square mile (301.6/km2), of which 4,129 were occupied, of which 2,160 (52.3%) were owner-occupied, and 1,969 (47.7%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 3.5%; the rental vacancy rate was 7.8%. 5,023 people (48.3% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 4,765 people (45.9%) lived in rental housing units. In the California State Legislature, Placerville is in the 1st Senate District, represented by Republican Brian Dahle, and the 5th Assembly District, represented by Republican Joe Patterson. In the United States House of Representatives, Placerville is in California's 5th congressional district, represented by Republican Tom McClintock. The region east of Placerville, popularly known as Apple Hill and Pleasant Valley, is becoming a center for wine production. The wine region is officially designated as the El Dorado AVA. The largest wineries in the area are Boeger, Lava Cap and Madrona, but most of the 30 plus wineries surrounding Placerville are family owned and smaller in wine grape and wine production. The region is "renown[ed] for making vibrantly flavorful, distinctly delicious wines, grown in the dramatic elevations of the Sierra Nevada." The area is increasingly a center for sophisticated production of Rhone style wines, noted by El Dorado County having a local chapter of the Rhone Rangers winemaker association. Formerly known as Anderson Field, the arena and main grandstand that is now known as Placerville Speedway was originally built by the El Dorado County Fair during the winter months of 1956. Constructing a clay racing surface around the perimeter of the football field, Warren Jewitt and Bruno Romani created what was originally known as "Hangtown Speedway". Auto racing took place here for the first time on June 18, 1965. Since 1965, Placerville Speedway has hosted several racing divisions. The track was cut out of a hillside, giving it higher banking, and covered with a dark red clay racing surface. Placerville is home to the Mountain Democrat, the oldest continuously published newspaper in California, and Marshall Medical Center. Placerville is served by two major highways. California State Route 49 runs north and south, connecting the city with the other major communities in the Sierra Nevada foothills. U.S. Route 50 heads west to Sacramento and east to South Lake Tahoe. This portion of U.S. Route 50 is a part of the Lincoln Highway. El Dorado Transit runs public bus service, both local routes connecting Placerville to other populated areas on the western slope and weekday commuter service to/from Sacramento, including the 20 bus to Iron Point Station. Amtrak Thruway 20C provides a daily connection to Sacramento Valley Station to the west, and South Lake Tahoe to the east, with a few stops in between. Placerville is served by the Placerville Airport. A "Good Neighbor" airport (one that takes measures for noise abatement), it has a 4,200-foot-long (1,300 m) runway, but is not currently served by any commercial air transport. Placerville has many old buildings from the Gold Rush days. A walk down Main Street also reveals many historical markers, signifying spots of certain events or persons of importance during this period. Placerville was also on the line of the Pony Express, a short-lived mail carrier service that connected California to the Midwest and East (basically from Sacramento to St. Joseph, Missouri). Historically, Placerville was often referred to by the name "Hangtown," because of the 3 unfortunates that were hung after being caught for cattle rustling by locals. Those traveling in the area can still see the site of the hangman's platform that was used for public hangings along with a commemorative mannequin ("George") hanging from a noose above the Old Hangman's Tree (now an ice cream parlor). The dummy enjoyed a brief hiatus when town officials attempted to freshen up the town's image before returning due to popular demand. In 2015 the dummy was stolen. It has since been replaced. In April 2021, the city council agreed unanimously to remove the noose from the city's logo. Placerville is home to the legendary dish known as the "Hangtown fry" which includes eggs, bacon, and oysters. There are multiple legends regarding the origin, but all stories agree that Placerville is the place of origin. The Southern Pacific Transportation Company branch line was purchased from the Union Pacific in 1996 for $14 million (~$25.1 million in 2023) by the Joint Powers Authority consisting of Sacramento County, Folsom, and El Dorado County. The line is being converted to a hiking and biking trail, with over 12 miles of the rail line now paved as a Class 1 biking route. Placerville is the home of United Ancient Order of Druids of California Grove No. 1, which was established in 1860 as the first Druid hall in California. It was reinstated in 2017–18, along with several other historical fraternal societies. Main Street Placerville features a large stone column holding a glass and metal "torch" known as "The Druid Monument", commemorating the Order's inception there 1860. The City of Placerville is currently attempting to repave the roundabout containing the monument, possibly removing it permanently in the process—a proposal that has divided the community. Over the years many influential people had shops in Placerville, mostly along the now historic Main Street. Community Observatory Placerville Mountain Democrat Placerville Pioneer Jewish Cemetery Official website The Mountain Democrat (local newspaper) Placerville Downtown Association

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