July 2024

Chiropractor Davis CA

Davis chiropractor

Davis Chiropractor

Finding a chiropractor in Davis can be overwhelming, but your search doesn’t have to be. If you are looking for a chiropractor in Davis, you have options.

Check with your insurance povider

If you plan on using your health insurance, first be sure your insurance covers chiropractic care. You should also note the amount of visits they allow per year. Plus, be aware of any other limitations. This includes double checking co-pays and if they allow in or out of network chiropractors. A good chiropractor office will ask for your coverage before you walk into the office. But when it comes to medical costs, you want to ensure you do your homework first.

If you decide on a chiropractor who is out of network, you’ll have to decide whether it’s worth paying more for out of network, self-pay, or choosing another. The chiropractor's office will be able to provide you with the cost.

If you’re paying out of pocket, you should research local rates. Include the surrounding areas within the distance you’re willing to commute. This gives you a rough idea of what you’ll pay, which can be helpful if you’re on a budget.

Decide if you have a preference between a male or female chiropractor

Sometimes people have a presence. You should be 100 percent at ease with the chiropractor's presence.

Using a referral may help

A referral from your primary care doctor or specialist should point you toward a reputable Davis chiropractor. A doctor should only offer recommendations that they would use for themselves and family members. This can help you narrow down your search. If you have special criteria, such as location or their technique, let your doctor know that too.

Have you done some legwork, but you’re unsure about the names you’ve collected? You can share the information with your doctor. Ask if they would recommend any of the names.

Family and friends can also assist you in finding a chiropractor. Personal experiences make the best referrals. Be sure to ask within your circle too.

Once you’ve finished asking around, compare how many people have recommended the same Davis chiropractor. Chances are that is a great place to focus.

Ensure a chiropractor can treat you

Your chiropractor can treat mechanical issues musculoskeletal system. However, your Davis chiropractor can’t treat all associated pain with these areas. Severe arthritis, osteoporosis, broken or fractured bones, infected bones, and bone tumor related pain are a few conditions your chiropractor may not treat.

Other conditions some chiropractors can treat are high blood pressure, asthma and post stroke related pain. While these shouldn’t replace traditional medicine, your chiropractor and doctor could use them as therapeutic remedies with medication and other treatments.

Research chiropractor techniques

According to the American Chiropractic Association, they don’t support or endorse any one of the techniques. Chiropractors tend to have a skillset that covers multiple techniques. You should also ask whether the chiropractor uses hand manipulation, instruments or a combination depending on the patient’s need and preference.

If you favor a special technique, you should choose a chiropractor that has experience with it. You can also consider diversifying from what you’ve used in the past, and try a new technique to treat your condition.

Some common chiropractic techniques are:

  • Gonstead
  • Diversified
  • Applied Kinesiology
  • Logan Basic
  • Activator
  • Thompson
  • Flexion distraction

Keep in mind you might not be aware of what you prefer or dislike until after you’ve had your first few treatments. You should be comfortable expressing yourself. Your Davis chiropractor should listen to your wishes.

Does the chiropractor office offer additional services?

Some offices might offer additional services, such as massage or injury rehabilitation. View additional services as a bonus if the office offers them.

If your chiropractor suggests these services as part of your treatment plan, you will want to make sure your insurance covers them. Your insurance might place different limitations on those services, such as number of allowable visits.

Did the chiropractor attend an accredited institution?

Each state requires chiropractors to hold a doctorate in chiropractic medicine. If you’re unfamiliar with their college, you can search the school’s name on the Council of Chiropractic Education to ensure it’s an accredited institution.

Research the chiropractor online

Websites exist for patients to review their doctors, which includes chiropractors. Unlike testimonials that focus on the positive only, you can expect to see good, in between, and negative reviews from actual patients.

Take the time to read them, and don’t use star ratings to guide your decision. Some reviewers, for example, might dock stars for issues that don’t matter or relate to you. Be sure to note the date on negative reviews as well as any follow up comments from the practice.

How long has the chiropractor been in practice?

Skill and technique do improve with time, so you might prefer an experienced Davis chiropractor. A few years or longer, in addition to their education, is a decent amount of time for a chiropractor to hone their skills.

However, one with less hands-on experience might offer you the same results. Unless you have a specific preference, the length a chiropractor has been in practice might not matter to you.

Ask for a consult and meet Your chiropractor

Whether you have one chiropractor or a few in mind, you should meet face-to-face before you agree to services. Consider this first meeting like a job interview, but you’re the boss. Be prepared with a list of questions as well as addressing any concerns that arise during your visit.

Make visible inspections upon your visit. Is the office and waiting room clean? Are the staff pleasant and prompt? How long did you have to wait before the chiropractor saw you? Take your answers to these questions as part of the bigger picture.

What does a sample treatment plan look like?

Before you settle on a chiropractor, you should have a basic idea of what to expect during your course of treatment. This includes talking about your expectations as well as your chiropractor’s opinion on your treatment.

Ask about the length of treatment before you should see results. Time invested does vary and depends on the area you require treatment and the severity of your condition. Also, be sure to inquire about what happens if you don’t see improvements.

Personality

You should get along well with your Davis chiropractor and feel comfortable around them. This includes speaking to them about your care as well as when they touch you. If you don’t feel at-ease, you should consider finding a new chiropractor.

Concerns you should not ignore

The vast majority of chiropractors will put your health and goals first, but you should be cautious of chiropractors pushing unconventional options. Those may include:

  • Non-specialized care, meaning every patient receives the same treatment regardless of his or her pain or needs.
  • Unnecessary X-rays, which are billed to insurance companies. Deceptive chiropractors may push multiple, unnecessary X-rays to drive up the amount they are able to bill an insurance company.
  • You’re expected to heavily invest in a long-term plan prior to examination.
  • In your care plan, your chiropractor doesn’t address goals; there is no mention of pain plateaus or course of action should one occur.
  • The chiropractor makes dubious claims about curing chronic illnesses.
  • The chiropractor claims to be an expert in a technique that nobody has heard about.

As with any doctor, picking a chiropractor is a personal decision. Take your time to find the right one. If something feels off, you can likely change chiropractors.

Davis chiropractor

Davis is the most populous city in Yolo County, California, United States. Located in the Sacramento Valley region of Northern California, the city had a population of 66,850 in 2020, not including the on-campus population of the University of California, Davis, which was over 9,400 (not including students' families) in 2016. As of 2023, there were 40,850 students enrolled at the university. Davis sits on land that originally belonged to the Indigenous Patwin, a southern branch of Wintun people, who were killed or forced from their lands by the 1830s as part of the California Genocide through a combination of mass murders, smallpox and other diseases, and both Mexican and American systems of Indigenous slavery. Patwin burial grounds have been found across Davis, including on the site of the UC Davis Mondavi Center. After the killing and expulsion of the Patwin, territory that eventually became Davis emerged from one of California's most complicated ranchos, Laguna de Santos Callé. The 1852 Land Commission concurred with US Attorneys who argued that the grant was "fraudulent in all its parts," and in his 1860 District Court ruling Justice Ogden Hoffman observed that "It is impossible to contemplate without disgust the series of perjuries which compose the record" of the land grant. Nevertheless, Jerome C. Davis, a prominent farmer and one of the early claimants to land in Laguna de Santos Callé, lobbied all the way to the United States Congress in order to retain the land that eventually became Davis. Davis became a depot on the Southern Pacific Railroad in 1868, when it was named "Davisville" after Jerome C. Davis. However, the post office at Davisville shortened the town name to "Davis" in 1907. The name stuck, and the city of Davis was incorporated on March 28, 1917. From its inception as a farming community, Davis is known primarily for its contributions to agricultural policy along with veterinary care and animal husbandry. Following the passage of the University Farm Bill in 1905 by the California State Legislature, Governor George Pardee selected Davis out of 50 other sites as the future home to the University of California's University Farm, officially opening to students in 1908. The farm, later renamed the Northern Branch of the College of Agriculture in 1922, was upgraded to become the seventh UC general campus, the University of California, Davis, in 1959. Davis is located in Yolo County, California, 11 mi (18 km) west of Sacramento, 70 mi (113 km) northeast of San Francisco, 385 mi (619 km) north of Los Angeles, at the intersection of Interstate 80 and State Route 113. Neighboring towns include Dixon, Winters, Woodland, and West Sacramento. Davis lies in the Sacramento Valley, the northern portion of the Central Valley, in Northern California, at an elevation of about 52 feet (16 m) above sea level. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 10.5 square miles (27 km2). 10.4 square miles (27 km2) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) of it (0.19%) is water. The topography is flat, which has helped Davis to become known as a haven for bicyclists. The Davis climate resembles that of nearby Sacramento and is typical of California's Central Valley Mediterranean climate region: warm and dry in the spring, summer and autumn, and cool and wet in the winter. It is classified as a Köppen Csa climate. Summer days are hot, ranging from 85 to 105 °F (29 to 41 °C), but the nights turn pleasantly cool, almost always dropping below 70 °F (21 °C). The Delta Breeze, a flow of cool marine air originating from the Pacific Ocean via San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, frequently provides relief in the evening. Winter temperatures generally reach between 45 and 65 °F (7 and 18 °C) in the afternoon; nights average at about 35 to 40 °F (2 to 4 °C), but occasionally fall below freezing. Average temperatures range from 46 °F (8 °C) in December and January to 75 °F (24 °C) in July and August. Thick ground fog called tule fog settles into Davis during late fall and winter. This fog can be dense, with visibility nearly zero. As in other areas of northern California, the tule fog is a leading cause of road accidents in the winter season. Mean rainfall per annum is about 20 inches (510 mm). The bulk of rain occurs between about mid-November to mid-March, with typically no precipitation falling from mid-June to mid-September. Record temperatures range from a high of 116 °F (47 °C) on July 17, 1925, to a low of 12 °F (−11 °C) on December 11, 1932. Davis is internally divided by two freeways (Interstate 80 and State Route 113), a north–south railroad (California Northern), an east–west mainline (Union Pacific) and several major streets. The city is unofficially divided into six main districts made up of smaller neighborhoods (often originally named as housing subdivisions): Central Davis, north of Fifth Street and Russell Boulevard, south of Covell Blvd., east of SR 113, and west of the railroad tracks running along G Street. Within these boundaries is the officially denoted neighborhood of Old North Davis, which is sometimes also considered part of Downtown. Downtown Davis, roughly the numbered-and-lettered grid north of I-80, south of Fifth Street, east of A Street, and west of the railroad tracks, including the Aggie Village and Olive Drive areas. East Davis, north of I-80, south of Covell Blvd., and east of the railroad tracks. It includes the older, 'inner' East Davis of lettered streets and neighborhoods such as Davis Manor, Chestnut, and Rancho Yolo, as well as more distinctly identified (in some cases walled-in) subdivisions such as Mace Ranch, Lake Alhambra Estates, and Wildhorse. North Davis, north of Covell Blvd. North Davis includes Covell Park, Senda Nueva, Northstar, and North Davis Farms. South Davis, south of I-80, and includes Willowbank. El Macero, California, although outside the city limits, is sometimes considered part of South Davis; El Macero is part of the Davis Joint Unified School District, and El Macero children who attend public schools attend Davis' public schools. West Davis, north of I-80 and west of SR 113. West Davis includes Westwood, Evergreen, Aspen, Stonegate (west of Lake Boulevard and including Stonegate Lake and the Stonegate Country Club) and the eco-friendly Village Homes development, known for its solar-powered houses. The University of California, Davis is located south of Russell Boulevard and west of A Street and then south of 1st Street. The land occupied by the university is not incorporated within the boundaries of the city of Davis and lies within both Yolo and Solano Counties. Local energy planning began in Davis after the energy crisis of 1973. A new building code promoted energy efficiency. Energy use in buildings decreased dramatically and in 1981 Davis citizens won a $100,000 prize from utility PG&E, for cutting electricity use during the summer peak. On November 14, 1984, the Davis City Council declared the city to be a nuclear-free zone. In 1998, the City passed a "Dark Skies" ordinance in an effort to reduce light pollution in the night sky. In 2013, Davis became part of the state Cool Roof Initiative with the "CoolDavis" campaign, requiring all new roofing projects to meet Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) requirements, including the installation of light-colored roofs. The aim is to reflect more sunlight back into space via the albedo effect, and reduce the amount of heat absorbed in hopes of limiting climate change. Davis is part of the Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2020 Census the population of Davis was 66,850 people. [1] In 2020 the racial demographics were as follows: 53.6% White 2.3% Black 13.8% Hispanic or Latino 23.3% Asian 1.1% Native American 9.6% 2 or more races The 2010 United States Census reported that Davis had a population of 65,622. The population density was 6,615.8 inhabitants per square mile (2,554.4/km2). The racial makeup of Davis was 42,571 (64.9%) White, 1,528 (2.3%) African American, 339 (0.5%) Native American, 14,355 (21.9%) Asian, 136 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 3,121 (4.8%) from other races, and 3,572 (5.4%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8,172 persons (12.5%). Davis' Asian population of 14,355 was apportioned among 1,631 Indian Americans, 6,395 Chinese Americans, 1,560 Korean Americans, 1,185 Vietnamese Americans, 1,033 Filipino Americans, 953 Japanese Americans, and 1,598 other Asian Americans. Davis' Hispanic and Latino population of 8,172 was apportioned among 5,618 Mexican American, 221 Puerto Rican American, 80 Cuban American, and 2,253 other Hispanic and Latino. The Census reported that 63,522 people (96.8% of the population) lived in households, 1,823 (2.8%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 277 (0.4%) were institutionalized. There were 24,873 households, of which 6,119 (24.6%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 9,343 (37.6%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 1,880 (7.6%) had a female householder with no husband present, and 702 (2.8%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 1,295 (5.2%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 210 (0.8%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 5,952 households (23.9%) were made up of individuals, and 1,665 (6.7%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55. There were 11,925 families (47.9% of all households); the average family size was 2.97. The population age and sex distribution was 10,760 people (16.4%) under the age of 18, 21,757 people (33.2%) aged 18 to 24, 14,823 people (22.6%) aged 25 to 44, 12,685 people (19.3%) aged 45 to 64, and 5,597 people (8.5%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25.2 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.0 males. There were 25,869 housing units, with an average density of 2,608.0 per square mile (1,007.0/km2), of which 10,699 (43.0%) were owner-occupied, and 14,174 (57.0%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 0.9%; the rental vacancy rate was 3.5%. 27,594 people (42.0% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 35,928 people (54.7%) lived in rental housing units. As of the United States 2000 Census, there were 60,308 people, 22,948 households, and 11,290 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,769.2 inhabitants per square mile (2,227.5 inhabitants/km2). There were 23,617 housing units at an average density of 2,259.3 per square mile (872.3/km2). The racial composition of the city was 70.07% White, 2.35% Black or African American, 0.67% Native American, 17.5% Asian, 0.24% Pacific Islander, 4.26% from other races, and 4.87% from two or more races. 9.61% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 22,948 households, of which 26.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.3% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.8% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were composed of individuals, and 5.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.00. In the city, the population age distribution was 18.6% under the age of 18, 30.9% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 16.7% from 45 to 64, and 6.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males. The median income for a household in the city was $42,454, and the median income for a family was $74,051. Males had a median income of $51,189 versus $36,082 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,937. About 5.4% of families and 24.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.8% of those under age 18 and 2.8% of those age 65 or over. This city of approximately 62,000 people abuts a university campus of 32,000 students. Although the university's land is not incorporated within the city, many students live off-campus in the city. According to the city's 2020 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the top employers in the city are: A community currency scheme was in use in Davis, called Davis Dollars. Bicycling has been one of the most popular modes of transportation in Davis for decades, particularly among school-age children and UC Davis students. In 2010, Davis became the new home of the United States Bicycling Hall of Fame. Bicycle infrastructure became a political issue in the 1960s, culminating in the election of a pro-bicycle majority to the City Council in 1966. By the early 1970s, Davis became a pioneer in the implementation of cycling facilities. As the city expands, new facilities are usually mandated. As a result, Davis residents today enjoy an extensive network of bike lanes, bike paths, and grade-separated bicycle crossings. The flat terrain and temperate climate are also conducive to bicycling. In 2005 the Bicycle-Friendly Community program of the League of American Bicyclists recognized Davis as the first Platinum Level city in the US Bicycling appears to be declining among Davis residents: from 1990 to 2000, the US Census Bureau reported a decline in the fraction of commuters traveling by bicycle, from 22 percent to 15 percent. This resulted in the reestablishment of the city's Bicycle Advisory Commission and creation of advocate groups such as "Davis Bicycles!". In 2016, Fifth Street, a main road in Davis was converted from four lanes to two lanes to allow for bicycle lanes and encourage more bicycling. In 1996, 2001, 2006, and 2009 the UC Davis "Cal Aggie Cycling" Team won the national road cycling competition. The team also competes off-road and on the track, and has competed in the national competitions of these disciplines. In 2007, UC Davis also organized a record breaking bicycle parade numbering 822 bicycles. A continuous stream of bands, speakers and various workshops occurs throughout Mother's Day weekend on each of Whole Earth Festival's (WEF) three stages and other specialty areas. The WEF is organized entirely by UC Davis students, in association with the Associated Students of UC Davis and the university. Celebrate Davis is the annual free festival held by the Davis Chamber of Commerce. It features booths by Davis businesses, live music, food vendors, live animals, activities like rock climbing and zip-line. It concludes with fireworks after dark. Parking is problematic, so most people ride their bikes and use the free valet parking. Picnic Day is an annual event at the University of California, Davis and is always held on the third Saturday in April. It is the largest student-run event in the US. Picnic Day starts off with a parade, which features the UC Davis California Aggie Marching Band-uh!, and runs through campus and around downtown Davis and ends with the Battle of the Bands, which lasts until the last band stops playing (sometimes until 2 am). There are over 150 free events and over 50,000 attend every year. Other highlights include: the Dachshund races, a.k.a. the Doxie Derby, held in the Pavilion; the Davis Rock Challenge, the Chemistry Magic Show, and the sheep dog trials. Many departments have exhibits and demonstrations, such as the Cole Facility, which until recently showed a fistulated cow (a cow that has been fitted with a plastic portal (a "fistula") into its digestive system to observe digestion processes). Its name was "Hole-y Cow". The Davis Transmedia Art Walk is a free—self-guided—public art tour includes 23 public murals, 16 sculptures, and 15 galleries and museums all in downtown Davis and the University of Davis campus. A free Davis Art Walk map serves as a detailed guide to the entire collection. The art pieces are all within walking distance of each other. The walk is a roughly circuitous path that can be completed within an hour or two. Every piece of art on the Art Walk has been embedded with an RFID chip. Using a cellphone that supports this technology, you access multimedia files that relate to each work. You can even leave a comment or "burn your own message" for other visitors to see. Artist hosted tours are held on the weekend by appointment only. To pick up a copy of the Davis Art Walk map, visit the Yolo County Visitors Bureau (132 E St., Suite 200; (530) 297–1900) or the John Natsoulas Center for the Arts (521 1st St.; (530) 756–3938). The Manetti Shrem Museum of Art, located on the UC Davis campus, opened on November 13, 2016, and carries on the legacy of the university's world-renowned first generation art faculty, which contributed to innovations in conceptual, performance and video art in the 1960s and 70s. The museum has generated nationwide attention with exhibits by artists such as Wayne Thiebaud, Bruce Nauman, John Cage, and Robert Arneson as well as its striking architecture, featuring a 50,000 square-foot “Grand Canopy” of perforated aluminum triangular beams, supported by 40 steel columns. Every year the museum exhibits works by graduating art students. The museum is free and hosts lecture series and events throughout the year, as well as weekend art studio activities for all ages. The Mondavi Center, located on the UC Davis campus, is one of the biggest non-seasonal attractions in Davis. The Mondavi Center is a theater which hosts many world-class touring acts, including star performers such as Yo-Yo Ma, Yitzhak Perlman and Wynton Marsalis, and draws a large audience from Sacramento. The UC Davis Arboretum is an arboretum and botanical garden. Plants from all over the world grow in different sections of the park. There are notable oak and native plant collections and a small redwood grove. A small waterway spans the arboretum along the bed of the old North Fork of Putah Creek. Occasionally herons, kingfishers, and cormorants can be seen around the waterways, as well as the ever-present ducks. Tours of the arboretum led by volunteer naturalists are often held for grade-school children. The Domes (AKA Baggins End Innovative Housing) is an on-campus cooperative housing community designed by project manager Ron Swenson and future student-residents in 1972. Consisting of 14 polyurethane foam-insulated fiberglass domes and located in the Sustainable Research Area at the western end of Orchard Road, it is governed by its 26 UCD student residents. It is one of the few student co-housing cooperative communities in the US, and is an early example of the modern-day growing tiny house movement. The community has successfully resisted several threats to its continuation over the years. The Davis Farmers Market is held every Wednesday evening and Saturday morning. Participants sell a range of fruits and vegetables, baked goods, dairy and meat products (often from certified organic farms), crafts, and plants and flowers. From April to October, the market hosts Picnic in the Park, with musical events and food sold from restaurant stands. Davis has one newspaper, The Davis Enterprise, a thrice-weekly newspaper founded in 1897. UC Davis also has a weekly newspaper called The California Aggie that covers campus, local and national news. Davis Media Access, a community media center, is the umbrella organization of television station DCTV. There are also numerous commercial stations broadcasting from nearby Sacramento. Davis has two community radio stations: KDVS 90.3 FM, on the University of California campus, and KDRT 95.7 FM, a subsidiary of Davis Media Access and one of the first low-power FM radio stations in the United States. Davis has the world's largest English-language local wiki, DavisWiki. In 2006, The People's Vanguard of Davis began news reporting about the city of Davis, the Davis Joint Unified School District, the county of Yolo, and the Sacramento area. Davis' Toad Tunnel is a wildlife crossing that was constructed in 1995 and has drawn much attention over the years, including a mention on The Daily Show. Because of the building of an overpass, animal lovers worried about toads being killed by cars commuting from South Davis to North Davis, since the toads traveled from one side of a dirt lot (which the overpass replaced) to the reservoir at the other end. After much controversy, a decision was made to build a toad tunnel, which runs beneath the Pole Line Road overpass which crosses Interstate 80. The project cost $14,000, equivalent to $28,000 in 2023. The tunnel is 21 inches (53 cm) wide and 18 inches (46 cm) high. The University of California, Davis, or UC Davis, a campus of the University of California, had a 2019 Fall enrollment of 38,369 students. UC Davis has a dominant influence on the social and cultural life of the town. Also known as Deganawidah-Quetzalcoatl University, D-Q University was a two-year institution located on Road 31 in Yolo County 6.7 miles (10.8 km) west of State Route 113 which closed in 2005. The curriculum was said to include heritage and traditional American Indian ceremonies. The 643 acres (2.60 km2) and 5 buildings were formerly a military reservation according to the National Park Service publication Five Views. According to some tribal members, use of the spelled-out name of the university can be offensive, and the institution should only be referred to as D-Q University. Tribal members in appropriate circumstances may use the full name. An off-campus branch of Sacramento City College is located in Davis. The satellite is located in West Village, an area built by UC Davis to house students and others affiliated with the university. Davis' public school system is administrated by the Davis Joint Unified School District. The city has nine public elementary schools (North Davis, Birch Lane, Pioneer Elementary, Patwin, Cesar Chavez, Robert E. Willett, Marguerite Montgomery, Fred T. Korematsu at Mace Ranch, and Fairfield Elementary (which is outside the city limits but opened in 1866 and is Davis Joint Unified School District's oldest public school)). Davis has one school for independent study (Davis School for Independent Study), four public junior high schools (Ralph Waldo Emerson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Frances Harper, and Leonardo da Vinci Junior High), one main high school (Davis Senior High School), one alternative high school (Martin Luther King High School), and a small project based high school (Leonardo da Vinci High School). Cesar Chavez is a Spanish immersion school, with no English integration until the third grade. The junior high schools contain grades 7 through 9. Due to a decline in the school-age population in Davis, two of the elementary schools in south Davis may have their district boundaries changed, or magnet programs may be moved to equalize enrollment. Valley Oak was closed after the 2007–08 school year, and their campus was granted to Da Vinci High (which had formerly been located in the back of Davis Senior High's campus) and a special-ed preschool. On average, class size is about 25 students for every teacher. At one time, Chavez and Willett were incorporated together to provide elementary education K–6 to both English-speaking and Spanish immersion students in West Davis. César Chávez served grades K–3 and was called West Davis Elementary, and Robert E. Willett (named for a long-time teacher at the school, now deceased) served grades 4–6 and was known as West Davis Intermediate. Willett now serves K–6 English-speaking students, and Chavez supports the Spanish immersion program for K–6. Davis Waldorf School (Pre-K–8) Peregrine School (Pre-K–6) These are some notable Davis residents, other than UC Davis faculty who were not previously from Davis. Davis' sister cities are: 2023 Davis, California stabbings Davis Community Church, 1800s structure, congregation Lake Davis, California Official website Davis, California at Curlie

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