July 2024

Chiropractor New Braunfels TX

New Braunfels chiropractor

New Braunfels Chiropractor

Finding a chiropractor in New Braunfels can be overwhelming, but your search doesn’t have to be. If you are looking for a chiropractor in New Braunfels, you have options.

Check with your insurance povider

If you plan on using your health insurance, first be sure your insurance covers chiropractic care. You should also note the amount of visits they allow per year. Plus, be aware of any other limitations. This includes double checking co-pays and if they allow in or out of network chiropractors. A good chiropractor office will ask for your coverage before you walk into the office. But when it comes to medical costs, you want to ensure you do your homework first.

If you decide on a chiropractor who is out of network, you’ll have to decide whether it’s worth paying more for out of network, self-pay, or choosing another. The chiropractor's office will be able to provide you with the cost.

If you’re paying out of pocket, you should research local rates. Include the surrounding areas within the distance you’re willing to commute. This gives you a rough idea of what you’ll pay, which can be helpful if you’re on a budget.

Decide if you have a preference between a male or female chiropractor

Sometimes people have a presence. You should be 100 percent at ease with the chiropractor's presence.

Using a referral may help

A referral from your primary care doctor or specialist should point you toward a reputable New Braunfels chiropractor. A doctor should only offer recommendations that they would use for themselves and family members. This can help you narrow down your search. If you have special criteria, such as location or their technique, let your doctor know that too.

Have you done some legwork, but you’re unsure about the names you’ve collected? You can share the information with your doctor. Ask if they would recommend any of the names.

Family and friends can also assist you in finding a chiropractor. Personal experiences make the best referrals. Be sure to ask within your circle too.

Once you’ve finished asking around, compare how many people have recommended the same New Braunfels chiropractor. Chances are that is a great place to focus.

Ensure a chiropractor can treat you

Your chiropractor can treat mechanical issues musculoskeletal system. However, your New Braunfels chiropractor can’t treat all associated pain with these areas. Severe arthritis, osteoporosis, broken or fractured bones, infected bones, and bone tumor related pain are a few conditions your chiropractor may not treat.

Other conditions some chiropractors can treat are high blood pressure, asthma and post stroke related pain. While these shouldn’t replace traditional medicine, your chiropractor and doctor could use them as therapeutic remedies with medication and other treatments.

Research chiropractor techniques

According to the American Chiropractic Association, they don’t support or endorse any one of the techniques. Chiropractors tend to have a skillset that covers multiple techniques. You should also ask whether the chiropractor uses hand manipulation, instruments or a combination depending on the patient’s need and preference.

If you favor a special technique, you should choose a chiropractor that has experience with it. You can also consider diversifying from what you’ve used in the past, and try a new technique to treat your condition.

Some common chiropractic techniques are:

  • Gonstead
  • Diversified
  • Applied Kinesiology
  • Logan Basic
  • Activator
  • Thompson
  • Flexion distraction

Keep in mind you might not be aware of what you prefer or dislike until after you’ve had your first few treatments. You should be comfortable expressing yourself. Your New Braunfels chiropractor should listen to your wishes.

Does the chiropractor office offer additional services?

Some offices might offer additional services, such as massage or injury rehabilitation. View additional services as a bonus if the office offers them.

If your chiropractor suggests these services as part of your treatment plan, you will want to make sure your insurance covers them. Your insurance might place different limitations on those services, such as number of allowable visits.

Did the chiropractor attend an accredited institution?

Each state requires chiropractors to hold a doctorate in chiropractic medicine. If you’re unfamiliar with their college, you can search the school’s name on the Council of Chiropractic Education to ensure it’s an accredited institution.

Research the chiropractor online

Websites exist for patients to review their doctors, which includes chiropractors. Unlike testimonials that focus on the positive only, you can expect to see good, in between, and negative reviews from actual patients.

Take the time to read them, and don’t use star ratings to guide your decision. Some reviewers, for example, might dock stars for issues that don’t matter or relate to you. Be sure to note the date on negative reviews as well as any follow up comments from the practice.

How long has the chiropractor been in practice?

Skill and technique do improve with time, so you might prefer an experienced New Braunfels chiropractor. A few years or longer, in addition to their education, is a decent amount of time for a chiropractor to hone their skills.

However, one with less hands-on experience might offer you the same results. Unless you have a specific preference, the length a chiropractor has been in practice might not matter to you.

Ask for a consult and meet Your chiropractor

Whether you have one chiropractor or a few in mind, you should meet face-to-face before you agree to services. Consider this first meeting like a job interview, but you’re the boss. Be prepared with a list of questions as well as addressing any concerns that arise during your visit.

Make visible inspections upon your visit. Is the office and waiting room clean? Are the staff pleasant and prompt? How long did you have to wait before the chiropractor saw you? Take your answers to these questions as part of the bigger picture.

What does a sample treatment plan look like?

Before you settle on a chiropractor, you should have a basic idea of what to expect during your course of treatment. This includes talking about your expectations as well as your chiropractor’s opinion on your treatment.

Ask about the length of treatment before you should see results. Time invested does vary and depends on the area you require treatment and the severity of your condition. Also, be sure to inquire about what happens if you don’t see improvements.

Personality

You should get along well with your New Braunfels chiropractor and feel comfortable around them. This includes speaking to them about your care as well as when they touch you. If you don’t feel at-ease, you should consider finding a new chiropractor.

Concerns you should not ignore

The vast majority of chiropractors will put your health and goals first, but you should be cautious of chiropractors pushing unconventional options. Those may include:

  • Non-specialized care, meaning every patient receives the same treatment regardless of his or her pain or needs.
  • Unnecessary X-rays, which are billed to insurance companies. Deceptive chiropractors may push multiple, unnecessary X-rays to drive up the amount they are able to bill an insurance company.
  • You’re expected to heavily invest in a long-term plan prior to examination.
  • In your care plan, your chiropractor doesn’t address goals; there is no mention of pain plateaus or course of action should one occur.
  • The chiropractor makes dubious claims about curing chronic illnesses.
  • The chiropractor claims to be an expert in a technique that nobody has heard about.

As with any doctor, picking a chiropractor is a personal decision. Take your time to find the right one. If something feels off, you can likely change chiropractors.

New Braunfels chiropractor

New Braunfels ( BRAWN-fəlz) is a city in Comal and Guadalupe counties in the U.S. state of Texas. It is the seat of Comal County. The city covers 44.9 square miles (116 km2) and had a population of 90,403 as of the 2020 Census. A suburb just north of San Antonio, and part of the Greater San Antonio metropolitan area, it was the third-fastest-growing city in the United States from 2010 to 2020. As of 2022, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates its population at 104,707. New Braunfels is known for its German Texan heritage. New Braunfels was established in 1845 by Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels, Commissioner General of the Mainzer Adelsverein, also known as the Noblemen's Society. Prince Carl named the settlement in honor of his home of Solms-Braunfels, Germany. The Adelsverein organized hundreds of people in Germany to settle in Texas. Immigrants from Germany began arriving at Galveston in July 1844. Most then traveled by ship to Indianola in December 1844, and began the overland journey to the Fisher-Miller land grant purchased by Prince Carl. At the urging of John Coffee Hays, who realized the settlers would not have time to build homes and plant crops further inland before winter, and as the German settlers were traveling inland along the Guadalupe River, they stopped near the Comal Springs. Prince Carl bought two leagues of land from Rafael Garza and Maria Antonio Veramendi Garza for $1,111.00. The land was located northeast of San Antonio on El Camino Real de los Tejas and had the strong freshwater Comal Springs, known as Las Fontanas, when the Germans arrived. It was about halfway between Indianola and the lower portions of the Fisher-Miller land grant. The first settlers forded the Guadalupe River on Good Friday, March 21, 1845, near the present-day Faust Street bridge. As the spring of 1845 progressed, the settlers built the "Zinkenburg", a fort named for Adelsverein civil engineer Nicolaus Zink, divided the land, and began building homes and planting crops. Prince Carl would also lay the cornerstone for the Sophienburg, a permanent fort and center for the immigrant association. In 1844, Prince Carl was so disillusioned with the logistics of the colonization that he asked the Verein to remove him as commissioner-general and appoint a successor. When John O. Meusebach arrived, the finances were in disarray, due in part to Prince Carl's lack of business experience and his refusal to keep financial records. To a larger degree, the financial situation happened because the Adelsverein was an organization of noblemen with no practical backgrounds at running businesses. They were on the other side of the world and did not witness the situation with which both Prince Carl and Meusebach were dealing. Henry Francis Fisher had not supplied transport and supplies for which the Verein advanced money to him. Meusebach found Prince Carl in Galveston trying to return to Germany, detained by authorities for unpaid bills. Meusebach made good on the debts, so Prince Carl could depart. Meusebach discovered that Prince Carl's choice of the inadequate Carlshafen (Indianola) as a port of entry, as well as the isolated route to New Braunfels, was deliberately chosen to keep the Germans from interacting with any Americans. According to Nicolaus Zink, Prince Carl had planned to establish a German feudal state by secretly bringing in immigrants and placing them in military fortresses. Meusebach, who had renounced his own title of nobility, took a different approach and invited Americans to settle in the Vereins territory. Prince Carl, being an officer of the Imperial Army of Austria, had kept a uniformed military unit at the ready in Indianola. Meusebach converted the military unit to a more needed work detail. A finance and business structure for the colony was put in place by Meusebach. He also provided for adequate food and shelter for the colonists. On August 11, 1845, Hermann Friedrich Seele became the first teacher for the German-English school in New Braunfels. Meusebach established friendly relations with a local tribe of Waco Indians. Upon seeing his reddish-blonde hair, they called him Ma-be-quo-si-to-mu, "Chief with the burning hair of the head". In May 1846, Meusebach received a letter from Count Castell informing him 4,304 emigrants were on their way to Texas. With no funds and no new settlements, the mass of emigrants was stalled at Carlshafen. Meusebach's requests to the Verein for more money, and his warnings of pending bankruptcy for the Verein, brought no results. As a last resort, Meusebach instructed D.H. Klaener to publish the plight in the German news media. Embarrassed by the publicity, the Verein established a $60,000 letter of credit. The amount was not adequate for sustaining the total number of German emigrants in Texas, but Castell also sent Philip Cappes as special commissioner to observe the situation. Cappes had also been instructed by Castell to observe Meusebach and to secretly report back every detail. By the time Cappes departed in March 1847, he recommended another $200,000 be advanced. Cappes invited Henry Francis Fisher to New Braunfels, in spite of Fisher not being entirely trustworthy to the Verein. As of February 11, 1845, Fisher had been involved in coercing newly arrived immigrants to sign documents stating their intent to depart from the Verein and align with Fisher's friend Friedrich Schubbert, also known as Friedrich Strubberg. Cappes was not in town when Meusebach was breakfast host to Fisher on December 31, 1846. Posters had mysteriously appeared about town maligning Meusebach, saying "Curses upon Meusebach the slave driver", and inciting colonists to free themselves from his "tyranny". A group led by Rudolph Iwonski pushed their way into Meusebach's home, and colonist C. Herber brandished a whip. Herber was an alleged counterfeiter to whom Count Castell had awarded asylum. Meusebach and Herber shared a dislike of one another. The colonists' list of demands included Meusebach resigning as commissioner-general and turning the colonization over to Fisher. Meusebach kept his composure, but the group became so heated, they yelled, "Hang him!" When the estimated 120 men dispersed, Fisher was nowhere to be found. The same evening, a different group of individuals assembled and pledged to stand by Meusebach, the next day passing resolutions condemning the actions of the mob. Meusebach himself had considered leaving Texas as early as November 1845, when he wrote to Count Castell and announced his intention to resign and return to Germany. Meusebach did not feel the Adelsverein was organized enough to achieve its goals. After the mob visit in New Braunfels, he again submitted his resignation to accompany a financial report to Castell on January 23, 1847. Meusebach had arranged with the Torrey Brothers for transporting the emigrants inland, but the United States hired the Torrey Brothers for use in the Mexican–American War. Meusebach stabilized the community's finances, and encouraged the settlers to establish additional neighboring communities. The largest of these secondary settlements was Fredericksburg, 80 miles (130 km) to the northwest of New Braunfels. New Braunfels thrived, and by 1850, it was the fourth-largest city in Texas, with 1,723 people, following only Galveston, San Antonio, and Houston in population. In 1852, the Zeitung newspaper was established, edited by German Texan botanist Ferdinand Lindheimer. The newspaper continues to publish under its current name, the Herald-Zeitung. New Braunfels is located in southeastern Comal County. The city is 32 miles (51 km) northeast of Downtown San Antonio, 19 miles (31 km) southwest of San Marcos, and 48 miles (77 km) southwest of Austin. According to the United States Census Bureau, New Braunfels has a total area of 44.9 square miles (116.4 km2), of which 44.4 square miles (115.1 km2) is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km2), or 0.91%, is covered by water. The city is situated along the Balcones Fault, where the Texas Hill Country meets rolling prairie land. Along the fault in the city, a string of artesian springs known as Comal Springs gives rise to the Comal River, which is known as one of the shortest rivers in the world, as it winds 3 miles (5 km) through the city before meeting the Guadalupe River. Gruene Historical District is located within the city limits of New Braunfels. Founded by the sons of settlers Ernst and Antoinette Gruene, the community had a bank, post office, school, general store, lumberyard, gristmill, dance hall, and cotton gin. It also had access to two railways for shipping cotton bales. Its most famous attribute was the dance hall, a family activity in those days. Due to the failure of the cotton crop from boll weevils, and the failure of the banks after 1929, commercial activity slowed to a crawl. This village is now a Nationally Registered Historic District where one can dine in the ruins of the original gristmill or enjoy live music at Gruene Hall. New Braunfels experiences a humid subtropical climate, with hot, humid summers and generally mild winters. Temperatures range from 83 °F (27.8 °C) in the summer to 49 °F (9.4 °C) during winter. The city falls in USDA hardiness zones 8b (15 °F to 20 °F) and 9a (20 °F to 25 °F). New Braunfels and San Antonio, 32 miles (51 km) to the southwest, are some of the most flood-prone regions in North America. The October 1998 Central Texas floods were among the costliest floods in United States history, resulting in $750 million in damage and 32 deaths. In 2002, from June 30 to July 7, 35 in (890 mm) of rain fell in the area, resulting in widespread flooding and 12 fatalities. In New Braunfels, July and August tie for the average warmest months, with an average high of 95 °F (35 °C). May, June, and October receive far more precipitation than the rest of the year. The average annual precipitation has been 35.74 inches (908 mm). As of the 2020 United States census, there were 90,403 people, 30,855 households, and 20,946 families residing in the city. At the census of 2000, 36,494 people, 13,558 households, and 9,599 families resided in the city. The population density was 1,247.7 inhabitants per square mile (481.7/km2). The 14,896 housing units averaged 509.3 per square mile (196.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 84.30% White, 1.37% African American, 0.55% Native American, 0.58% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 10.93% from other races, and 2.24% from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 34.52% of the population. For the year 2015, New Braunfels was named the U.S.'s second-fastest growing city with a population of 50,000 or more, according to estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau. In 2019, the American Community Survey determined there were 90,209 residents, up 56.4% since the 2010 U.S. census which determined the population was 57,740. The population density was 1,316.1 people per square mile. In 2019, the racial and ethnic makeup of New Braunfels was 60.4% non-Hispanic white, 2.0% Black or African American, 0.4% American Indian or Alaska Native, 1.5% Asian, 2.1% from two or more races, and 34.4% Hispanic or Latin American of any race. By 2020, its population grew to 90,403 residents. The 2019 American Community Survey estimated 62.2% of housing units were owner-occupied and the median selected monthly owner costs were $1,599 with a mortgage, and $509 without a mortgage. The city had a median gross rent of $1,183 and there were a total of 28,835 households with an average of 2.72 persons per household. In 2019, the median household income was $71,044 and the per capita income was $33,405. An estimated 8.6% of New Braunfels lived at or below the poverty line. Of the 13,558 households at the 2000 census, 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.4% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.2% were not families. About 24.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.11. In 2000, the population was distributed as 25.7% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 20.6% from 45 to 64, and 16.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.3 males. The median income for a household in the city was $40,078, and for a family was $46,726 in 2000. Males had a median income of $31,140 versus $23,235 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,548. About 9.0% of families and 10.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.9% of those under age 18 and 9.7% of those age 65 or over. Companies based in New Braunfels include Rush Enterprises and Schlitterbahn. The top employers in the area are: Most of the city is served by the New Braunfels Independent School District and the Comal Independent School District in separate places. Small portions in Guadalupe County are within the Marion Independent School District and the Navarro Independent School District. Two traditional public high schools are located within city limits, as well as a freshmen center. The public high schools are New Braunfels High School, Canyon High School, and Alamo Colleges-Memorial Early College High School. Private high schools are New Braunfels Christian Academy, a K–12 institution, and the Calvary Baptist Academy. NBISD operates several schools in New Braunfels. Carl Schurz, County Line Road, Klein Road, Lamar, Memorial, Seele, Veramendi, Voss Farms, and Walnut Springs elementary schools New Braunfels Middle and Oak Run Middle Long Creek High and New Braunfels High CISD schools serving New Braunfels are: Morningside, Clear Spring, Goodwin Frazier, Hoffmann Lane, and Freiheit elementary schools Canyon Middle and Church Hill Middle Canyon High The town holds "Wurstfest", a German-style sausage festival, every November, drawing on the city's strong German heritage. Every December, the town celebrates Wassailfest in the historic downtown. New Braunfels draws a large number of tourists, particularly in the summer because of the cold-spring rivers that run through the city. Many generations of families and college students return every summer to tube for miles down the Guadalupe and Comal rivers. New Braunfels is the site of the original water park, the Schlitterbahn WaterPark Resort. The Ernest Eikel Skate Park attracts many skate board enthusiasts. New Braunfels also hosts a Buc-ee's gas station, which is recognized as the largest gas station in the world. The 10,000-capacity Unicorn Stadium is the largest sports venue by capacity in New Braunfels. It opened in 1927 and it is used mostly for American football and soccer. The venue also has an athletics track. New Braunfels is home to the Museum of Texas Handmade Furniture, Sophienburg Museum and Archives, McKenna Children's Museum, and Alamo Classic Car Museum. The newspaper Herald Zeitung was originally two newspapers: The Herald (published in English) and The Zeitung, which means "newspaper", (published in German) until 1967. The other newspaper publisher serving the city of New Braunfels is the TX Citizen, formerly the NB citizen has been discontinued. In radio, two stations broadcast from New Braunfels, KGNB 1420 AM/ 103.1 FM and KNBT 92.1 FM, notable for its Americana music format. Joe Aramendia, racing driver John Aramendia, racing driver Louis Beam, American white supremacist and neo-fascist Lance Berkman, six-time MLB All-Star, attended Canyon High School in New Braunfels Donna Campbell, Republican State Senator from New Braunfels since 2013 Parker Chase, American professional racing driver Sherman Corbett, former pitcher for the California Angels. Riley Dickinson, American professional racing driver Charles Duke, Apollo Lunar Module pilot on the Apollo 16 Moon landing mission Abby Dunkin, American 3.5 point wheelchair basketball player Craig Jordan, pioneer in the use of Tamoxifen as an adjuvant therapy for breast cancer treatment and prevention, used in millions of patients Ray Katt, Major League Baseball player Devin Patrick Kelley, mass murderer, perpetrator of the Sutherland Springs church shooting Kliff Kingsbury, former head coach of NFL's Arizona Cardinals Robert Krueger, Democrat, former U.S. Representative and former interim (appointed) U.S. senator Doug Miller, Republican, former Texas House of Representatives from the 73rd district Ferdinand Lindheimer, known as the father of Texas botany Leigh Nash, member of the band Sixpence None the Richer George E. Nowotny, Republican member of the Arkansas House of Representatives from 1967 to 1972, born in New Braunfels in 1932 Demi Payne, American track and field athlete Victoria Scott, American writer of young adult fiction novels Matt Slocum, member of the band Sixpence None the Richer Jordan Westburg, American professional baseball shortstop Dustin Ybarra, American stand-up comedian actor Johnny Be Good, 1988 American comedy film by Orion Pictures Starring Robert Downey Jr., Anthony Michael Hall and Paul Gleason. Michael, 1996 American fantasy film Starring John Travolta distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures and New Line Cinema The Newton Boys, 1998 American comedy-drama film Distributed by 20th Century Fox. Adventures in Appletown (also known as Kings of Appletown or Hidden Treasure of the Mississippi), a 2008 dramedy/adventure film starring twin brothers Dylan Sprouse and Cole Sprouse and Victoria Justice. Fear the Walking Dead, American post-apocalyptic horror drama television series created by Robert Kirkman and Dave Erickson aired on AMC. Schultze Gets the Blues, a 2003 German comedy-drama film Distributed by Paramount Classics. The Bachelorette, an American reality television dating game show aired on ABC. The Daytripper, 9-time Lone Star Emmy Award-winning travel show aired on PBS. Revolution, American post-apocalyptic sci-fi-drama television series NBC. Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over, a 2003 American spy action comedy film, the sequel to Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams starring twin brothers Antonio Banderas and Salma Hayek and Sylvester Stallone. Lone Star Law, is an American reality television series that debuted on June 2, 2016 Animal Planet. Walker, is an American action crime drama television series developed by Anna Fricke for The CW. List of museums in Central Texas King, Irene Marschall (1967). John O.Meusebach. University of Texas Press. ISBN 978-0-292-73656-6. Lich, Glen E (1996). The German Texans. University of Texas Press. ISBN 978-0-86701-072-5. Biesele, Rudolph Leopold (2008) [1930]. The History of the German Settlements in Texas 1831–1861. Eakin Press. ISBN 978-1-57168-857-6. Haas, Oscar (1983) [1968]. History of New Braunfels and Comal County, Texas 1844–1946. Solms, Carl; Gish, Theodore G; Von-Maszweski, Wolfram M (2000). Voyage to North America, 1844–45: Prince Carl of Solms' Texas Diary of People, Places, and Events. University of North Texas Press. ISBN 978-1-57441-124-9. Morgenthaler, Jefferson (2007). The German Settlement of the Texas Hill Country. Mockingbird Books. ISBN 978-1-932801-09-5. Johnson, David; Miller, Rick (2009). The Mason County ""Hoo Doo"" War, 1874–1902 (A.C. Greene Series). University of North Texas Press. ISBN 978-1-57441-262-8. Kattner, Lauren Ann (1991). "From Immigrant Settlement into Town: New Braunfels, Texas, 1845–1870". American Studies. 36 (2): 155–177. City of New Braunfels official website New Braunfels Chamber of Commerce New Braunfels from the Handbook of Texas Online

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