July 2024

Chiropractor Los Alamitos CA

Los Alamitos chiropractor

Los Alamitos Chiropractor

Finding a chiropractor in Los Alamitos can be overwhelming, but your search doesn’t have to be. If you are looking for a chiropractor in Los Alamitos, you have options.

Check with your insurance povider

If you plan on using your health insurance, first be sure your insurance covers chiropractic care. You should also note the amount of visits they allow per year. Plus, be aware of any other limitations. This includes double checking co-pays and if they allow in or out of network chiropractors. A good chiropractor office will ask for your coverage before you walk into the office. But when it comes to medical costs, you want to ensure you do your homework first.

If you decide on a chiropractor who is out of network, you’ll have to decide whether it’s worth paying more for out of network, self-pay, or choosing another. The chiropractor's office will be able to provide you with the cost.

If you’re paying out of pocket, you should research local rates. Include the surrounding areas within the distance you’re willing to commute. This gives you a rough idea of what you’ll pay, which can be helpful if you’re on a budget.

Decide if you have a preference between a male or female chiropractor

Sometimes people have a presence. You should be 100 percent at ease with the chiropractor's presence.

Using a referral may help

A referral from your primary care doctor or specialist should point you toward a reputable Los Alamitos chiropractor. A doctor should only offer recommendations that they would use for themselves and family members. This can help you narrow down your search. If you have special criteria, such as location or their technique, let your doctor know that too.

Have you done some legwork, but you’re unsure about the names you’ve collected? You can share the information with your doctor. Ask if they would recommend any of the names.

Family and friends can also assist you in finding a chiropractor. Personal experiences make the best referrals. Be sure to ask within your circle too.

Once you’ve finished asking around, compare how many people have recommended the same Los Alamitos chiropractor. Chances are that is a great place to focus.

Ensure a chiropractor can treat you

Your chiropractor can treat mechanical issues musculoskeletal system. However, your Los Alamitos chiropractor can’t treat all associated pain with these areas. Severe arthritis, osteoporosis, broken or fractured bones, infected bones, and bone tumor related pain are a few conditions your chiropractor may not treat.

Other conditions some chiropractors can treat are high blood pressure, asthma and post stroke related pain. While these shouldn’t replace traditional medicine, your chiropractor and doctor could use them as therapeutic remedies with medication and other treatments.

Research chiropractor techniques

According to the American Chiropractic Association, they don’t support or endorse any one of the techniques. Chiropractors tend to have a skillset that covers multiple techniques. You should also ask whether the chiropractor uses hand manipulation, instruments or a combination depending on the patient’s need and preference.

If you favor a special technique, you should choose a chiropractor that has experience with it. You can also consider diversifying from what you’ve used in the past, and try a new technique to treat your condition.

Some common chiropractic techniques are:

  • Gonstead
  • Diversified
  • Applied Kinesiology
  • Logan Basic
  • Activator
  • Thompson
  • Flexion distraction

Keep in mind you might not be aware of what you prefer or dislike until after you’ve had your first few treatments. You should be comfortable expressing yourself. Your Los Alamitos chiropractor should listen to your wishes.

Does the chiropractor office offer additional services?

Some offices might offer additional services, such as massage or injury rehabilitation. View additional services as a bonus if the office offers them.

If your chiropractor suggests these services as part of your treatment plan, you will want to make sure your insurance covers them. Your insurance might place different limitations on those services, such as number of allowable visits.

Did the chiropractor attend an accredited institution?

Each state requires chiropractors to hold a doctorate in chiropractic medicine. If you’re unfamiliar with their college, you can search the school’s name on the Council of Chiropractic Education to ensure it’s an accredited institution.

Research the chiropractor online

Websites exist for patients to review their doctors, which includes chiropractors. Unlike testimonials that focus on the positive only, you can expect to see good, in between, and negative reviews from actual patients.

Take the time to read them, and don’t use star ratings to guide your decision. Some reviewers, for example, might dock stars for issues that don’t matter or relate to you. Be sure to note the date on negative reviews as well as any follow up comments from the practice.

How long has the chiropractor been in practice?

Skill and technique do improve with time, so you might prefer an experienced Los Alamitos chiropractor. A few years or longer, in addition to their education, is a decent amount of time for a chiropractor to hone their skills.

However, one with less hands-on experience might offer you the same results. Unless you have a specific preference, the length a chiropractor has been in practice might not matter to you.

Ask for a consult and meet Your chiropractor

Whether you have one chiropractor or a few in mind, you should meet face-to-face before you agree to services. Consider this first meeting like a job interview, but you’re the boss. Be prepared with a list of questions as well as addressing any concerns that arise during your visit.

Make visible inspections upon your visit. Is the office and waiting room clean? Are the staff pleasant and prompt? How long did you have to wait before the chiropractor saw you? Take your answers to these questions as part of the bigger picture.

What does a sample treatment plan look like?

Before you settle on a chiropractor, you should have a basic idea of what to expect during your course of treatment. This includes talking about your expectations as well as your chiropractor’s opinion on your treatment.

Ask about the length of treatment before you should see results. Time invested does vary and depends on the area you require treatment and the severity of your condition. Also, be sure to inquire about what happens if you don’t see improvements.

Personality

You should get along well with your Los Alamitos chiropractor and feel comfortable around them. This includes speaking to them about your care as well as when they touch you. If you don’t feel at-ease, you should consider finding a new chiropractor.

Concerns you should not ignore

The vast majority of chiropractors will put your health and goals first, but you should be cautious of chiropractors pushing unconventional options. Those may include:

  • Non-specialized care, meaning every patient receives the same treatment regardless of his or her pain or needs.
  • Unnecessary X-rays, which are billed to insurance companies. Deceptive chiropractors may push multiple, unnecessary X-rays to drive up the amount they are able to bill an insurance company.
  • You’re expected to heavily invest in a long-term plan prior to examination.
  • In your care plan, your chiropractor doesn’t address goals; there is no mention of pain plateaus or course of action should one occur.
  • The chiropractor makes dubious claims about curing chronic illnesses.
  • The chiropractor claims to be an expert in a technique that nobody has heard about.

As with any doctor, picking a chiropractor is a personal decision. Take your time to find the right one. If something feels off, you can likely change chiropractors.

Los Alamitos chiropractor

Los Alamitos (Spanish for 'The Little Cottonwoods') is a city in Orange County, California. The city was incorporated in March 1960. The population was 11,780 at the 2020 census, up from 11,449 at the 2010 census. The adjacent unincorporated community of Rossmoor uses the same 90720 ZIP code in its mailing address, but is not part of the city. The Los Alamitos Race Course is named for the city, but lies in the neighboring city of Cypress. The USA Water Polo National Aquatic Center is located on the Joint Forces Training Base - Los Alamitos. Native Americans inhabited the area. The history of the area during the Californio period and after U.S. annexation is detailed in the article on Rancho Los Alamitos. The town of Los Alamitos was established in 1896 by Lewellyn Bixby to support the new sugar beet factory in town built by the extremely wealthy Clark Brothers. William Andrews Clark, a future Senator from Montana, had built his fortune in mining, banking and logging in that state. His younger brother, J. Ross Clark, managed their operations in California after he moved to that state for health reasons. Lewellyn Bixby, whose family owned the surrounding land on the Rancho Los Cerritos and Rancho Los Alamitos, had been trying to build a sugar beet factory in that area for a few years but, due to financial losses in the 1880s, he no longer had the financial capital to undertake the sugar beet factory complex on his own. Bixby had made his fortune back in the 1850s when he and his cousins Benjamin and Thomas Flint, formed Flint, Bixby & Co. which became a thriving entity in mutton and wool, all originally housed on the Rancho San Justo, south of San Jose. After making an additional fortune from selling wool to the government during the Civil War, the Flints and Bixby bought up many properties in Southern California. One was the future Irvine Ranch and another was the Rancho Los Cerritos which makes up much of the western half of Long Beach. Flint, Bixby hired Lewellyn's younger brother Jotham to manage the Cerritos. When Flint, Bixby broke up Lewellyn assumed their Southern California properties and moved to Los Angeles and became the senior partner in his operations with his brother Jotham. Around 1881, a cousin, John W. Bixby wanted to purchase the Rancho Los Alamitos. John W. put together a consortium of himself, his cousins Lewellyn and Jotham (owners of Rancho Los Cerritos) and banker I.W. Hellman to finance the purchase of the Alamitos land. Upon John's sudden death on May 7, 1887, the ranch was divided between the three owning families. The northern third adjacent to the Rancho Los Cerritos — the land roughly north of present Orangewood Ave.—went to the Lewellyn-Jotham faction (which later became the Bixby Land Company). By the mid-1890s, after the crash following the land boom of the 1880s—this group was relatively cash-poor and land rich. Having experimented in Northern California with sugar beets, the Bixbys agreed to provide the land, and contracted with Montana copper baron William A. Clark to provide the capital, and got E.A. Dyer to provide the expertise to build a new sugar beet factory on the Bixby's land. The community that grew up around this new sugar beet factory complex—with its streets of company houses for workers and surrounding farms—came to be called Los Alamitos. (As part of his arrangement to build and operate the sugar beet factory, William Clark and his brother H. Ross, who actually ran the Los Alamitos operation, also received 1,000 acres east of the factory and a year later completed a purchase of 8,000 acres (32 km2) of land north of the sugar plant—most of the latter in the Rancho Los Cerritos boundaries—that would eventually become the Long Beach Airport, Long Beach City College, and the city of Lakewood. Also, Clark and Hellman were intricately involved with the machinations and corporate dealings of railroad tycoon E. H. Harriman and Henry Edwards Huntington and the destiny of the Southern Pacific in Southern California. In addition, some time after establishing Los Alamitos, the Clarks completed their railroad from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City, establishing the desert stop of Las Vegas in the process. In the early 1900s, sugar beets were delivered to a factory by horse and wagon. Economics and an elimination of a protective tariff, combined with an insect infestation in 1921, caused sugar-beet crop to drop significantly in Orange County and the eventual demise of the sugar beet industry there and in Los Alamitos. But the town that had sprung up continued to grow. On the lands south of the factory (and current Orangewood Avenue), Fred H. Bixby, son of John Bixby and future member of the Cowboy Hall of Fame, used his sugar beet lands as a finishing ranch to fatten cattle before sending them off to slaughter (he also managed Hellman's lands in present Seal Beach). Bixby, one of the more progressive ranchers of his time, allowed European immigrant, Mexican, and Japanese farmers to rent the land and grow crops. At the beginning of World War II, the Japanese farmers were rounded up by the military and relocated to internment camps at Manzanar and elsewhere. Just prior to and during early World War II, the area around Los Alamitos became a major center for the aircraft industry. The Clark heirs arranged for Donald Douglas to begin construction of the Douglas Aircraft Company aircraft plant just north of the Long Beach airport. At the same time the Navy decided it needed an auxiliary airfield for its Reserve Training facility at the increasingly crowded Airport. A touch and go field was built on the level ground just east of Los Alamitos in August 1940. This was the first military post in Orange County. In February 1941, the Navy decided to move all their reserve aviation training from Long Beach and purchased what would become a 1300-acre facility. Trainees and cadre began using the new facilities as early as November 1941, but it wasn't until May 1942 that NRAB Long Beach formally transitioned all operations to NRAB Los Alamitos. The new base provided many jobs and spurred growth in the town. After World War II, NRAB Los Alamitos was the busiest reserve air base in the nation for a while, especially during the Korean War, but by the late 1950s encroaching surrounding suburban residential development began to curtail its activity. The Navy moved out in 1972 and in 1973, the California National Guard took over management of the base, re-designated an Armed Forces Reserve Center. Today, it is a reserve support center for units of the Army, Navy, National Guard and Marines, but is also a home to many other government agencies, including Homeland Security, FEMA and the State of California Office of Emergency Services. Many former military personnel chose to stay on in Los Alamitos after the war, living in such new neighborhoods as Carrier Row, where streets are named for World War II aircraft carriers, many of which had been the home for Navy pilots trained at Los Alamitos. Carrier Row was actually not one unit, but three small subdivisions built separately in 1947–48, 1950, and 1955 by different builders. The first of these units was the Alamos Ranchos which was first occupied in April 1948. These homes had sewage problems, and the builder stopped after completing only the two blocks east of Lexington and south of Katella. In 1950, two more blocks were constructed under the name of Plainview Homes. Finally, in 1955, the tract was completed with the construction of Los Alamitos Park. Another subdivision of 193 units, Los Alamitos Terrace, was built in the area north of Old Town West, on land once used as grazing land for Bixby-operated dairy farm—whose main headquarters were located where Los Alamitos High School now stands. But overall, these units were small compared to the next subdivision built in the area. In 1956 builder Ross Cortese purchased land to build the walled community of Rossmoor just southwest from the townsite of Los Alamitos. Rossmoor, still the largest single development in Orange County, was the first walled community in the United States and quickly became home to over 10,000 upper middle class professionals. Rossmoor's homes were designed initially by Earle G. Kaltenbach (who also designed Disneyland's original Tomorrowland), although two of the later phases were designed by Chris Choate, who achieved much fame as the frequent partner of Cliff May. Together the two men were among the most responsible for designing and popularizing the "ranch" style homes which dominated the suburban explosion of the 1950s. Prior to Rossmoor, Choate and May had worked with Cortese on building the nearby Lakewood Rancho Estates in Long Beach. Although Rossmoor never officially became part of Los Alamitos proper, it has become inextricably linked to the town. When Los Alamitos incorporated in 1960 its population was only about 3,400, while still-growing Rossmoor was nearing 10,000. Now they are fairly equal with Los Alamitos being slightly larger than 11,000. Rossmoor, still an unincorporated part of Orange County, doesn't pay taxes to Los Alamitos, but the city virtually treats Rossmoor residents as if they were residents. In exchange, the city's many youth programs benefit from the overwhelming number of Rossmoor residents who volunteer for those programs, and Rossmoor, having very little commercial areas of its own, contributes much sales tax revenue to Los Alamitos. The success of Rossmoor quickly led to other subdivisions in Los Alamitos—Dutch Haven (built in 1960 by Luxury Homes, and William G. Lyon), the Rossmoor Highlands (1961), Suburbia, New Dutch Haven, Greenbrook and College Park North (1967). The ambitious sugar-beet processor of today would be hard pressed to set up shop in Los Alamitos. Zoning laws keep out heavy manufacturing or industry because nearly all the city land is developed. The Armed Forces Reserve Center takes up 48 percent of the city's 4.3 square miles (11.1 km2). The rest of the city is a snug fitting mix of homes, apartments, businesses and open space. The small city has been the hometown for a number of noted athletes including baseball Hall of Famer Bob Lemon(although he spent more time in Long Beach), and Olympic gymnast Cathy Rigby. The Los Alamitos youth baseball leagues, which began in 1958 as the Rossmoor Little League and, after moving its fields to the Navy base, eventually changed its name to Los Alamitos Youth baseball - LAYB) has been home to many future major leaguers including Andy Messersmith, who challenged baseball's reserve clause and helped established free agency in professional sports . At one point in the late 1980s, six former league players were playing baseball in the major leagues—Robb Nen, J. T. Snow, Greg Harris, Dennis Lamp, Greg Pirkl, and Mike Kelly. The area is also home to record holding long-distance swimmer Lynne Cox. It was also home to California Supreme Court Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas while he served on the Court, and to award-winning mystery writer Jan Burke. Los Alamitos is bounded by Cypress to the north and east, West Garden Grove to the east, and Seal Beach to the south. The census-designated place of Rossmoor is enclosed by Los Alamitos to the north, east, and west. The city shares a northwestern border with Los Angeles County's Long Beach, namely the El Dorado Park neighborhood. Coyote Creek serves as a major geographical divider between Los Alamitos and Long Beach. Gardeners use several climate zone indicators to determine the proper plantings for an area. In the U.S. most plants and seeds are indicated for a particular climate by the USDA Hardiness Zone. A more exact measure is the Sunset zone. In Los Alamitos, the USDA Hardiness Zone is 9. The Sunset climate zone is 22. The 2010 United States Census reported that Los Alamitos had a population of 11,449. The population density was 2,781.8 inhabitants per square mile (1,074.1/km2). The racial makeup of Los Alamitos was 8,131 (71.0%) White (58.7% Non-Hispanic White), 324 (2.8%) African American, 51 (0.4%) Native American, 1,471 (12.8%) Asian, 50 (0.4%) Pacific Islander, 726 (6.3%) from other races, and 696 (6.1%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2,418 persons (21.1%). The Census reported that 11,206 people (97.9% of the population) lived in households, 40 (0.3%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 203 (1.8%) were institutionalized. There were 4,212 households, out of which 1,610 (38.2%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 2,025 (48.1%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 731 (17.4%) had a female householder with no husband present, 282 (6.7%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 209 (5.0%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 19 (0.5%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 885 households (21.0%) were made up of individuals, and 355 (8.4%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66. There were 3,038 families (72.1% of all households); the average family size was 3.10. The population was spread out, with 2,741 people (23.9%) under the age of 18, 1,077 people (9.4%) aged 18 to 24, 2,938 people (25.7%) aged 25 to 44, 3,099 people (27.1%) aged 45 to 64, and 1,594 people (13.9%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.7 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.1 males. There were 4,355 housing units at an average density of 1,058.2 per square mile (408.6/km2), of which 1,967 (46.7%) were owner-occupied, and 2,245 (53.3%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 0.8%; the rental vacancy rate was 3.1%. 5,274 people (46.1% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 5,932 people (51.8%) lived in rental housing units. According to the 2010 United States Census, Los Alamitos had a median household income of $80,449, with 7.2% of the population living below the federal poverty line. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,536 people, 4,246 households, and 3,035 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,875.5 inhabitants per square mile (1,110.2/km2). There were 4,329 housing units at an average density of 1,079.1 per square mile (416.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 77.0% White, 2.6% African American, 3.7% Native American, 9.5% Asian, 11.5% Pacific Islander, 5.1% from other races, and 4.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 22.3% of the population. There were 4,246 households, out of which 36.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.4% were married couples living together, 17.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.5% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.06. In the city, the population was spread out, with 25.2% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 30.8% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.4 males. The median income for a household in the city was $55,286, and the median income for a family was $60,767. Males had a median income of $49,946 versus $36,002 for females. The per capita income for the city was $26,014. About 4.1% of families and 5.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 8.8% of those age 65 or over. Property prices in the city have increased dramatically over the past 20 years. There is a city council. In the California State Legislature, Los Alamitos is in the 36th Senate District, represented by Republican Janet Nguyen, and in the 70th Assembly District, represented by Republican Tri Ta In the United States House of Representatives, Los Alamitos is in California's 45th congressional district, represented by Republican Michelle Steel. According to the California Secretary of State, as of February 10, 2019, Los Alamitos has 6,407 registered voters. Of those, 2,310 (36.05%) are registered Republicans, 2,067 (32.26%) are registered Democrats, and 1,712 (26.72%) have declined to state a political party/are independents. The first Claim Jumper restaurant opened in Los Alamitos in 1977. The location closed and is now a Hof's Hut. Neverland Studios, a recording studio that was often used by Christian rock bands, was originally located in Los Alamitos. Tillys had its original location in Los Alamitos. According to the City's 2022 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the top employers in the city are: Dana Andrews, actor Aaron Barrett (born 1974), musician, Founding member of Reel Big Fish Jonathan Bornstein (born 1984), soccer player for USA National Team, Chivas USA, and Chicago Fire Tim Carey, football player—attended Los Alamitos HS, but grew up in Seal Beach Kami Cotler (born 1965), actress Lynne Cox, long-distance swimmer Landry Fields, basketball player for New York Knicks of the NBA—attended Los Alamitos HS, but grew up in Long Beach Scott Klopfenstein, musician, former member of Reel Big Fish Chris Kluwe, former punter for the Minnesota Vikings of the NFL—attended Los Alamitos HS, but grew up in Seal Beach Bob Lemon, baseball Hall of Famer as pitcher and manager, lived in City Garden Acres (now Apartment Row) and attended Laurel Elementary before family moved to Long Beach Marcedes Lewis, tight end for the Green Bay Packers of the NFL Allison Mack, actress (known as "Chloe" from Smallville) Taryn Manning (born 1978), actress Matthew Morrison, singer and actor (Broadway plays, Fox TV's Glee) -- attended Los Alamitos HS, but grew up in Cypress Tony Muser, former MLB player and manager Robb Nen, baseball player—attended Los Alamitos HS, but grew up in Seal Beach Cathy Rigby, Olympic gymnast and actress Matt "Money" Smith, Fox Sports Radio talk show host J.T. Snow (born 1968), baseball player—attended Los Alamitos HS, but grew up in Seal Beach Jodie Sweetin, actress ("Stephanie Tanner" from Full House) Ralph Flanagan (swimmer), Olympic swimmer Nikki Monninger, bass guitarist for Silversun Pickups It is a part of the Los Alamitos Unified School District, which began in 1898 as the Laurel Elementary School District, and changed its name in 1953 to the Los Alamitos Elementary School District, providing education up through sixth grade. Students in Grades 7-12 attended schools in the Anaheim School District, until 1979 when local voters, after a few failed attempts, finally received state permission to hold an election, and voted to withdraw from the Anaheim High School District and unify all their local grades under the name the Los Alamitos Unified School District. Los Alamitos High School (opened September 1967, moved into current permanent location in September 1968) Laurel High School (continuation school, absorbed into Los Alamitos High School in 2014) McAuliffe Middle School (originally named Pine Jr. High) Oak Middle School (originally named Oak Jr. High) Hopkinson Elementary in Rossmoor, California Lee Elementary in Rossmoor, California Los Alamitos Elementary Rossmoor Elementary in Rossmoor, California Weaver Elementary in Rossmoor, California St. Hedwig School, a K–8 private school Official website Los Alamitos Chamber of Commerce: History Local History for Los Alamitos, Rossmoor & Seal Beach

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